• nordlicht,


    Danke!


    This makes sense to me - more than schillinge. 8 sgr would correspond roughly to the US cents break down I show for German and Swiss transit.


    Do you note also the red "2 ?" marking in crayon that is with the blue 8? Do you have thoughts on that? And who would apply these markings? I am guessing the red marking in Hamburg.


    These are details I enjoy, but I find I am unsure about with US items through Germany.


    Best,
    Rob

  • You are welcome.


    I noted the red "2" but I am not sure regarding the meaning. Probably Hamburg applied it in order to indicate a double-weight letter.


    Regards,
    nordlicht

  • Hello all!


    I will share more of my exhibit pages with you by finding appropriate topics on the forum and posting the page. Eventually, I will have all pages converted and will make a web page with the entire exhibit for viewing.


    This time I show an item originating in the US and going via French Mail to Switzerland.


    Of particular interest to me at this time is research on the mail routes in Europe that carried US foreign mail. For example, I realize that there were multiple crossings for mail exchange between France and Switzerland, especially if you consider border mail. But, the number of crossings that would carry mail that originated in the United States (or was heading to the United States) was limited.


    For France and Switzerland, I am fairly certain that the crossings at St Louis/Basel and Pontarlier. For Bremen/Hamburg mails, it appears most foreign mail from the US enters at Basel, though I am aware that an entry in the northeast is also possible. I would be happy to hear of knowledge and/or opinions regarding these routes during the 1860's.


    Best,
    Rob

  • Hello Rob


    first of all I would love to see your whole collection in a row somewhere in the forum here. Maybe our 3 admins can help you here (nils, michael + kreuzer).


    For Bremen/Hamburg mails, it appears most foreign mail from the US enters at Basel, though I am aware that an entry in the northeast is also possible. I would be happy to hear of knowledge and/or opinions regarding these routes during the 1860's.


    Interesting point, but not (always) easy to explain:


    Hamburg + Bremen were used for international postage from the prince of Thurn und Taxis. Those letters usually transited Germany via Hanover/Brunswick/Hesse/Bade during the 1860s to Efringen (Bade) or Friedrichshafen (Wurttemberg) via Lake Constance.


    As this long transit route was not for free, Thurn und Taxis made contracts with those involved countries that allowed a closed mail transport, so you can´t see any handstamps of any postoffice. Letters were transported only via trains to the Swiss border.


    PCM letters via Aachen differ much from that, as they (usually) show handstamps from involved postoffices (but sometimes those were forgotten, or they hat not time enough time for this procedure).

    Liebe Grüsse vom Ralph


    Terret vulgus, nisi metuat. Tacitus

  • It is still the farming season for me, so I am afraid I will make a short post and disappear again for a while. However, I was able to acquire a new item for my collection and exhibit this Spring and I thought I would share my exhibit page. I always welcome comments and corrections because it is important to me to be correct in my descriptions.
    Below is an item from the United States to Switzerland that was paid only to the border between the DOPV / GAPU and Switzerland.
    As a side note. I was able to show my 24 cent 1861 US postal history exhibit at the APS Stampshow in Omaha, Nebraska a week ago. I was surprised and pleased to receive the Grand award for the multiple frame open competition. This is something I don't think I expected I would ever do.
    Best,
    Rob

  • Hello Rob


    Congratulations for your success in exhibiting your collection - I don´t wonder, why you´ve got the Grand award.


    Everything is perfect with your description - may be you should have added that the receiver lived in Staufen near Lenzburg, so there was a rural postman involved as well, what makes the letter even better. A very fine piece with the Prussian handstamp in blue "Franco Preuss: resp Vereinl: Ausg:Gr" which is quite rare to find (van der Linden No. 1505, value in blue about 400 - 600 $).


    Hope to see more new pages from your collection when it´s winter again. ;)

    Liebe Grüsse vom Ralph


    Terret vulgus, nisi metuat. Tacitus

  • Liebe Freunde,


    aus der Sammlung eines großen CH - Sammlers zeige ich heute einen USA - Brief von Boston (Mass.) nach Lausanne (CH) mit späterer Weiterleitung unter poste restante nach Heidelberg (Dt. Reich) vom 13.8.1886.


    Sehr selten ist dabei eine Unterfrankatur, die Schweizer Portomarke, die Bezahlung des Restportos und die spätere Aufgabe mit 25 Rappen poste restante ins Deutsche Reich.


    Ein 2. Stück will erst noch gefunden werden ... :P

  • Ich kann damit zwar nicht mehr viel anfangen weil es ausserhalb meiner beobachteten Zeit ist.

    Aber ein Hammerbrief auf jedenfall. Ich gehe davon aus das ich deinen Freund kenne...


    So hat jeder sein Spezialgebiet, find ich echt toll 😊

  • Hello Rob,


    the letter was double weight. So there were missing 5 Cts equivalent to 25 Rappen (Cts). The addressee had to pay double rate. But as as he meanwhile was in Germany the Swiss officials added a stamp of 25 Rappen for the forwarding to Germany.


    Dieter

  • Hello Rob


    no. The sender paid 5 cents instead of 10 cents für a double weight letter.


    In Switzerland they charged the recepient with 50 Centimes/Rappen. As the redepient was no longer in Switzerland, somebody paid that to get the letter. Below the postage due stamp is written "bezahlt" = paid.


    A few days later he paid 25 Centimes/Rappen for the letter showing the new address in Heidelberg and wanted the letter to rest at the post office there.

    Liebe Grüsse vom Ralph


    Terret vulgus, nisi metuat. Tacitus

  • Danke,

    Sorry for the confusion. I should probably try to read the cover more before I try to read the Deutsch!

    Makes sense to me now.

    That's twice in a week I've been led astray by my bad reading of a non-English language! :P

    Rob